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KNOW BEFORE YOU GO - STAY SAFE & HEALTHY ABROAD (foreign office travel advice)

Menorca

AVERAGE CUSTOMER SAVING£321

Menorca Holidays 2016/2017

Menorca, as its name suggests, is Majorca's little brother. But what it lacks in size, it makes up for in just about everything else. Out in the Mediterranean Sea, Menorca is one of the most loved destinations for people holidaying in Spain.

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Don't miss the festivities

With its many relaxing villages and lively towns, beautiful and luscious landscapes, cool blue coasts, beach resorts and fantastic restaurants, Menorca opens its heart to all who visit. Even though thousands holiday in Menorca every year, the island has kept its culture intact. In fact, many visitors come for this very reason. For instance, the island's summer fiestas are a must-see.

Even though thousands holiday in Menorca every year, the island has kept its culture intact. In fact, many visitors come for this very reason. For instance, the island's summer fiestas are a must-see.

The 'Festes de Sant Joan', celebrations happen in June every year and last for three days. A sight to behold, main streets are closed to play host to parades of black horses, men carrying sheep and jousting competitions, as well as bonfires and fireworks displays in the evenings.

Where to stay in Menorca

Arenal Den Castell
Arenal Den CastellView on Map

A standalone resort on the northern coast of Menorca, Arenal Den Castell offers fun family attractions alongside a large horseshoe beach.

A resort that is popular with all ages, everyone can enjoy the spacious and peaceful Blue Flag winning beach of Arenal Den Castell. You can have fun on the alluring ocean too by hiring a kayak or pedalo.

Elsewhere you can spend an action packed day at the new Aqua Park or at one of the two amusement parks. For adults there are a great selection of lively but friendly bars and clubs to enjoy.

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Binibeca
BinibecaView on Map

This quiet south coast resort remains serene thanks to the absence of high-rise hotels. The wholesome atmosphere is consistent from the unique looking village, along the water front and into the nearby next town.

The Biniveba Vell village has been designed so every building looks like a sugar cube. Walk through the unique collection of structures to see villas, bars, shops and restaurants. This marks the starting point of the resort which runs from here to the great beach.

A gentle bay area that is safe for kids and offers a fun selection of water activities, Binibeca is a great choice for all members of the family.

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Cala Galdana
Cala GaldanaView on Map

Cala Galdana is a Menorcan resort surrounded by miles of striking nature. The beach alone is often cited as being the best on the island and once you gaze upon the large stretch of sand that is surrounded by rocky cliffs and pine-clad hills, you'd have to agree.

Cala Galdana has some great features that accompany the beach. You'll find bars, shops and restaurants nearby while some hotels lead right out onto the sand. Start your ocean voyage from this resort as boat trips take you across the water to spot breath-taking views of the coast.

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Ciutadella
CiutadellaView on Map

Menorca's former capital still has plenty of clues that point to its important history. The buildings and streets here have been formed over centuries with French and British influences. The Ciutadella Cathedral stands tall over the town and has done since 1362.

After you've finished exploring the town you can enjoy the nearby water park, go karting track or motocross circuit. If they're a bit too extreme then there are miles of natural hiking trails and ancient ruins to discover along the way. Also you're never too far away from a beach along the west coast.

This town has a great selection of shops, bars and restaurants for relaxing evenings too.

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Es Castell
Es CastellView on Map

Menorca's Spanish town with the most obvious British colonial influences, Es Castell is an important resort that is right next to the capital Mahon.

Ruins, forts and castles are all open to explore in and around the town with the underground tunnels of Fort Marlborough being the most popular.

Es Castell is a coastal town that replaces a beach with a delightful harbour area. Along the marina you're offered several opportunities to rest in a bar, restaurant or café and enjoy a meal while watching the boats dock. Nightlife here is laidback but Mahon next door has a livelier offering.

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Son Bou
Son BouView on Map

Home to the largest beach in Menorca, Son Bou is a popular resort that fronts a long 3km of Balearic Island sand.

The large resort is surrounded by smaller ones and other tourists flock here to sample the fun nightlife found in the bars and restaurants of Son Bou. Through the day the fantastic accommodation provides fun activities for young ones but the beach is this resort's main attraction.

Grassy reeds and sandy dunes surround the beach keeping it au natural but there are also exciting water sports to hire as well as scuba opportunities.

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Quick Tips

  • Roman Catholic
  • Euro
  • Catalan
  • 70,000
  • GMT +1

An island as old as time

Megalithic stone monuments are scattered around Menorca as evidence of humanity's early activity on the island. These impressive historical structures are thousands of years old and make for the perfect hiking holiday for any keen explorer or historian.

However, if it's hot sand and refreshing sea you're after then you'll find unspoilt and beautiful beaches which you can have almost to yourself. Many of these are complete with coastal ridges which can be walked until you find the beach that is right for you.

The entire island is encircled by an ancient path called the Cami de Cavalls, stretching for 186 kilometres around Menorca's coast. Meaning 'Way of the Horses', you can traverse it on horseback, bike or just with your own two feet and take in the incredible coastal views.

Take a dip

If taking a dip isn't far enough into the waters, then it's easy to find a way out further onto the high seas. Hire a boat and see the island from the outside, stopping at isolated beaches only accessible by sea for a picnic before heading back out again to swim. With dozens of opportunities to dive, kayak, or sail, Menorca has become a top destination for exciting activities both on land and at sea.

Go to town in Menorca

The island's towns of Ciutadella and Mahon are beautiful, especially in the spring when blossom begins to grow. Ciutadella, in the west, has a fortified harbour glistening in the sun, and the capital Mahon, to the east, has rows of tiled rooftops. Both are perfect places to visit for the day or night and are well-connected by public transport with nearby resorts and hotels.

A great range of bars, restaurants and shops make these towns lively and vibrant locations for visitors to the island who wish to experience the local culture and meet fellow travellers.

A gin and tonic to cool down

Menorca is famous for its taste for gin, something it inherited from the Brits. Locals mix their gin with bitter lemon to make the much loved drink 'pomada', the most refreshing way to cool yourself down on the beach or by the pool after a long day out on the island.

After almost a century, Menorca is now once again becoming known for its wine production too. Make sure you enjoy a glass from one of the local wineries which are popping up around the island, or a carafe over a plate of shellfish at one of the great seafood restaurants.

So much of the food served on Menorca is grown, reared or caught on the island, making it truly genuine Mediterranean cuisine. In Menorca, it's worth trying to eat where the locals eat. You can trust that even if you order out of your comfort zone, you'll be treated to outstanding flavours from chefs who source all their ingredients organically from nearby.

Beautiful and genuine, all year round

Menorca's climate means that over winter a lot of places are closed. However, as spring begins in March, everything begins to heat up again. If you go early enough you can avoid peak season prices. Also, the climate will be mild enough to cycle around the island enjoying the sights and smells of the landscape, and you'll still be able to lie on the beach and enjoy the sun.

Of course, if you're after a fully-fledged summer holiday, then between mid-July and mid-September is the time to catch all the rays you can before the kids go back to school. Even at the busiest times of the year, the island somehow still manages to have that special something. Menorca is a one-of-a-kind destination, which offers great food, drink, country walks, seaside breaks, activities and nightlife all in one authentic island experience.