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What to pack in your inflight bag

 

in flight bag

Long-haul flights can be exciting and daunting in equal measure: you might be jetting off to somewhere new and exotic for your holiday, but before you can reach those golden sands or bath-warm waters, you have to contemplate 8+ hours in an aeroplane seat! This said, there are plenty of ways to stay comfy, relaxed and entertained while you’re up in the air and it all comes down to what you put in your trusty in-flight bag. So here at Holiday Hypermarket, we’ve come up with a few tips on how to pack your carry-on luggage to ensure that the air-time just flies by…

The important items

It goes without saying that everything you legally need to fly should be on your person, not in your hold luggage or left on your kitchen counter! So although it may sound obvious, it’s vital that you double-check your passport, money and any insurance or travel documents are on you when you board, thus avoiding any last-minute airport panic. Though you might not think you need all your cash to get from the airport to your hotel at the other end, it’s better to have it with you, rather than stash it in your checked-in bag and risk any delays or missing luggage.

The personal toolkit

For the same reason, make sure you have your full supply of daily medications or creams in your in-flight bag, in case there are any hold-ups with your checked baggage. It’s also a good idea to have a small bag of toiletries with you; things like deodorant, a toothbrush and some moisturiser can prove invaluable when you’re 5 hours in and feeling a little less than fresh!

This said, don’t forget the liquids rule that applies to all UK airports and many international ones as well – any liquids, including toiletries and lotions, and cosmetics such as mascara, are only allowed in 100ml containers in hand luggage. The containers must also all fit into one small plastic bag available from airport security. So if you do have any non-essential liquids which can be placed into the hold, is advisable to do so.

The refreshments

Most airlines will provide one or two in-flight meals on your journey, depending on how long you’re travelling for. However, don’t leave yourself climbing the walls with hunger while you wait for lunch to be served! Take a few slow-burn energy snacks, such as peanuts, cereal bars and fruit. Always have a bottle of water to prevent dehydration; you may not be allowed to take one through security, but you should be able to buy a sealed bottle from one of the retailers in the departure lounge, so long as you don’t open it before you get through the gate.

on board the flight

The entertainment

Nothing makes the hours stretch like feeling bored on the plane, so make sure you have enough reading material and you’ve topped up your mp3 player with plenty of tunes and podcasts before you zip up your carry-on bag. You might want to throw in a pen and notebook as well – it’s great fun keeping a travel diary and looking back on your adventures in years to come, and the trip begins with the outward journey, after all!

The wearable comfort

It’s important to be comfortable while you’re flying and it’s all too easy to become too hot or cold – or stressed! – when you’re stuck in an aeroplane with lots of other passengers. The trick with your in-flight wardrobe is to go with lots of thin layers that you can pull on or take off accordingly.  If you have trouble sleeping on planes, include an eye mask and earplugs in your bag and take some extra warm socks for naptime! Take a change of clothes in your hand luggage – it’ll make all the difference to your mood if you’ve got a clean set of togs on when you step off the plane in the Caribbean or New York.

So there you have it – all you need to do is follow these tips and you’ll be travelling like a celebrity jet-setter on your next long-haul trip!

What are your essential carry-on items? Do you have any tips to share with fellow travellers on how to survive long-haul flights?

Images by Frank C. Müller and Rene Ehrhardt, used under Creative Comms licence.

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