Cala San Vicente Holidays 2020/2021

In this upmarket corner of northwest Majorca, Cala San Vicente is first and foremost a traditional fishing village and secondly a holiday destination. Visitors are spoilt with three beaches, but expect to share them with the fishermen tending their nets. Days are spent on the beaches or discovering the beauty of the area and nights are low key, eating Majorcan treats in authentic restaurants and watching the sun set beyond the cliffs.

A trio of sands

All three of Cala San Vicente’s beaches are connected by footpaths so you can easily beach-hop. As the resort is situated on a hillside at the edge of the Sierra de Tramuntana mountain range, the footpaths are up and downhill with some steps. For your effort though, you’re rewarded with superb views from the clifftop coastal paths’ walking and cycling tracks.

The biggest and best-equipped beach is Blue Flag award winner Cala Barques to the north of the village. Backed by a handful of restaurants and beach bars, it has lifeguards and plenty of sun loungers and straw parasols. Next to here is the more secluded, yet still sandy, Santa Clara beach.

The other side of a rocky outcrop is where you’ll find Cala Molins beach. This large and peaceful stretch of fine sand offers lots of space as each year the beach is supplemented with imported sand. It also has lifeguards and a good beachside bar.

There is a further small pebble beach with rock pools beside Molins beach that isn’t the best for sunbathing but snorkellers will love floating around the rocks and spotting crabs here.


Currency: Euro (€)

Language: Catalan

Flight Time: Approx 2 hrs 30 mins

Time Difference: GMT +1

Religion: Roman Catholic

Location

Map showing the location of Cala San Vicente View Cala San Vicente on the map

Seaside sports

There are some rocks on the edge of Cala Barques beach and in the sea, which add to the natural feel of the area and make snorkelling fun. This beach is also the place to start your adventure by pedal boat jet ski.

Another popular pastime is scuba-diving and beginners can dive down to around 12 metres to see a whole array of underwater species. You can have a go at fishing in Cala San Vicente or just watch the local fishermen repair their nets and store goods in the corner of the beach.

Mellow evenings

The good selection of seaview restaurants and tavernas in Cala San Vicente mainly serve traditional, home-cooked Majorcan food. The fish and seafood on offer has more often than not been brought in by boat on to the beach that morning so is the ultimate in local produce. If you’re not into fish, never fear as steaks, burgers, pizza and pasta are easy to come by.

After dinner, you can retire to a beachside bar, Irish pub or a small Spanish restaurant to have a few drinks and nibble on tapas. There are no clubs in Cala San Vicente but 25 minutes by taxi and you can be on a dancefloor in Alcudia.

Pollensa and its ports

There are a few little shops along Cala San Vicente’s seafront but for more shopping opportunities the town of Pollensa and its seaside counterpart Puerto Pollensa are both about ten minutes away by car or bus. It’s also worth checking out Pollensa’s Sunday market and Puerto Pollensa’s Wednesday market for local crafts, produce and clothing.

Pollensa is an old Roman town with a maze of streets boasting craft shops and art galleries and a main square to sit around and lose a few hours over lunch. If you venture up the Calvari steps – there are 365 of them – to the chapel at the top, you’ll be able to see right back to Cala San Vicente and beyond.

Activities for all ages

There are several man-made caves from prehistoric times on the edge of Cala San Vicente that you can go inside – they are thought to be ancient burial grounds. Back above ground, the village’s mini golf course is a fun way to spend an hour or two. Or for more family entertainment, Alcudia is home to Hidropark waterpark with lots of slides and splash parks and more mini-golf.

Travelling south along the coast is an important wildlife habitat where you can spot native black vultures circling overhead. If you take the 20-minute drive to the S’Albufereta Nature Reserve its paths run beside reed-beds and lakes, home to greater flamingos and purple herons.