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KNOW BEFORE YOU GO - STAY SAFE & HEALTHY ABROAD (foreign office travel advice)

Marsa Alam

Things to do in Marsa Alam

With an inviting beach and classic surroundings, Marsa Alam is a great alternative destination. But don't think its quieter community values are going to stop you having a good time. From the coast and further inland, Marsa Alam is a great way to discover what Egypt holidays have to offer.

Head to the beach

We'll start with the obvious appeal, by telling you the beaches around Marsa Alam are some of the finest to touch the Red Sea. We're talking pristine white sands together with a sunshine-filled climate and constant heat. The sea is an appealing blue, with plenty to offer savvy swimmers or those looking for a boating trip.

The majority of Marsa Alam's coastal stretches are quiet and open, which makes them all the more personal. So, don't be surprised if you bag your own stretch of sand.

Sink beneath the surface

The Red Sea is a body of water rich in history and lore, from ancient shipwrecks to swathes of coral shining beneath the surface. Add the local population of dolphins, turtles and the odd shark or octopus to the mix, and you've got plenty of sea life to explore. Visitors can choose to hone their existing scuba skills or take an unforgettable first-time dive to one of the earth's most enticing underwater realms.

If that wasn't exciting enough, diving fans from across the globe describe Marsa Alam as the gateway to the Red Sea's secrets. Book one of our cheap Egypt holidays and discover them for yourself.

Adventures in Egyptian mystique

For all of Marsa Alam's promise of relaxation and affordable luxury, don't forget you're in Egypt, a country of unfathomable history and huge cultural significance. You may think Marsa Alam is too secluded a community to let you soak in that greatness, but think again. When you head towards the south you'll find an ancient emerald mine located in Wadi El Gamal, or The Valley of the Camels, where Cleopatra was said to have sourced precious gems.

The sense of adventure is ingrained in the people too, so expect plenty of treks, tours and quad bike rental opportunities during your stay.

Dine like a local

Food and drink in Marsa Alam are woven into the fabric of the community, and with such a close-knit feel, trying the local cuisine is a must. Egyptian classics like kushari, a tangy bundle of pasta, onions, tomato sauce and other vegetables, are always in plentiful supply.

Don't miss the chance to diversify your palate while you're here either, when you look beyond the resorts and hotels there's a good selection of homegrown restaurants specialising in European and Italian meals. Head for the bustling town of Port Ghalib, where you'll find even more choices.

Don't forget the hidden treasures of the region, with restaurants like La Mia Africa to the south – a neat retreat where steak and seafood are king. Fish dishes are plentiful in this area too, due to the Red Sea's close proximity, so you can expect delicious dishes around every corner.