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KNOW BEFORE YOU GO - STAY SAFE & HEALTHY ABROAD (foreign office travel advice)


Alcudia Holidays 2016/2017

In the relaxed town of Alcudia visitors can experience culinary revelations, ancient Roman happenings and, most of all, some serious rest and relaxation. From winding along the rugged coast on a 4x4 experience, to hiking into hidden caves nestled into the coastline, there's no limit to what you can do on this half of the island. Or, of course, you can just set up camp underneath a thatched umbrella and gaze out at the sea.

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Four different beaches

Alcudia's coastline is varied and scenic, broken into a number of beaches that each offer a unique way to relax beside the sea. The most popular beach is the Playa de Alcudia, where you can rent sun loungers and umbrellas for added relaxation. It's also bordered by bars and restaurants, which keep this beach scene lively and, most of all, convenient.

The gorgeous Playa Coll Baix is a sheltered cove carved into a cliffside. It's as stunning as it sounds, with turquoise waters and a pebbled beach that's only accessible on foot or by boat. Needless to say, it's pretty tranquil and idyllic. Once there, you can meet and greet the colourful fish swimming offshore or explore the caves lining the coast.

The Playa de Sant Joan is a peaceful bay lined with green cliffs, while the bustling Playa de Aucanada is a great day out with the family. Thatched umbrellas and sun loungers line the shore, while a long, wooden pier extends out into the water and is an excellent leaping-off point for a cool swim.

Quick Tips

  • Roman Catholic
  • Euro
  • Catalan
  • GMT + 1

Old town centre

Alcudia has been occupied since the Bronze Age 4,000 years ago, but it really took off as a town when the Romans took over. A number of relics from this era are still remarkably preserved and viewable by the public. The ancient town of Pollentia is particularly popular, with its Roman theatre.

The old town centre is still surrounded by 14th century walls and the houses inside date back to the 13th century. The cuisine and decor have been updated vastly since the Romans were around though.

Nowadays, visitors flock to this part of Alcudia for its restaurants and bistros, dishing up home-cooked meals. It also hosts a market twice a week, where locals sell handcrafted wares.

Activities by land and sea

The activities on Alcudia's shores are seemingly endless, from tours to leisurely games, to adrenaline sports out on the water. The Alcanada Golf Course is a favourite spot for those wanting a bit of relaxing activity out in the sun, without sacrificing views of the sea.

For those looking to pump up the energy, there's an incredible range of watersports to participate in, from kayaking to canoeing, scuba diving and snorkelling. Even touring the town is an adventure of its own, as there's no one way to get around – you can take a boating tour and explore the coastline or rev up a four-wheeler and go off-roading.

The Hidropark in Alcudia is more than just a waterpark – if you're travelling with kids, it's a great way to keep them occupied with a whole range of activities. Not only are there water slides, but a massive 54-hole mini-golf course and a go-kart track, enjoyable for kids of all ages.

Supreme cuisine for all occasions

Visitors to Alcudia will never face a shortage of restaurants, as there are more than 200 eateries in this region of Majorca alone. And the town doesn't scrimp on variety either, with selections ranging from Mediterranean to Indian and Italian, and everything in between, on and off the beach.

Critics agree that Como En Casa is the place to be in terms of cuisine and atmosphere – each of its rooms are decorated to look like rooms in a house and the food isn't shabby either.

Here, you can delight in authentic Mediterranean fare, pizzas and a long list of decadent desserts. There are also a number of upscale restaurants like sa Roqueta and Jardin, plus casual waterfront spots like Playera and Floridita.